My wife-to-be had to step out for an errand while dinner was cooking.

She already did all the hard work.

Everything was cleaned, cut up, assembled, and put in the oven.

She said, “All you have to do is take it out of the oven in 40 minutes.”

I immediately set the timer on my watch.

And then I forgot about the cooking food altogether.

Because that’s how my brain works.

I can remember getting a Mr. Potato Head for my 3rd birthday.

I can remember the party was at a pavilion in the beach parking lot.

My cousin was upset because he wanted to play with it and he had to leave.

But the dinner I just put in the oven is completely gone from my mind.

So there I was, trying to be a good fiancé and do the dishes.

I took off my Apple Watch, put it on its charger in my office, and turned on a podcast on my iPhone.

Then returned to the kitchen.

My Apple Watch requires the iPhone for pretty much everything (I don’t have the Apple Watch w/ the phone service built in).

In my mind, if I put a timer on my Apple Watch, my iPhone should know.

And if I take off my Apple Watch, my iPhone should know.

So when I take off my Apple Watch, and there’s a timer on it, the iPhone should let me know when the timer goes off.

The Apple Watch requires the iPhone.

If I set a timer, it’s obviously something important.

The User eXperience should always be:

Err in the favor of the user.

It should always be:

Protect the user’s interests.

Meaning:

The timer going off on a very smart device in one room that is connected to another very smart device in another room much closer to the user (I know they can measure this) should prioritize making sure the user knows the timer is going off.

Is this a UX issue? 

Is it some setting I turned off somewhere along the line?

Or is the real issue my reliance on technology?

I’ll order a big red tomato timer for the kitchen counter.

And instead of being a cook, I’ll stick to making music.

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